Sage Advice - Cybersecurity Blog

The Longer Arms of Privacy Laws

Privacy is difficult to define, much less protect. In the business realm, data privacy is still regularly confused with data security and the titles of those charged with safeguarding it for customers vary widely. Meanwhile, many organizations continue to collect as much personal data as they can, just because they can.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Privacy, Cloud Security

Call and Response: IR in the Cloud

In the rush to the cloud, infosec professionals struggle to translate their existing security capabilities, controls, and processes to the new environment.  One of the last processes they adapt? Incident response, said Dave Shackleford, as he kicked-off his 2019 CyberCrime Symposium presentation. A primary reason, he said, is they can’t get the same real-time visibility into events that they could in their traditional environments.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Cloud Security

Cyber-Risk, Meet Cyber-Resilience

Some five years back, Don Anderson, CIO at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, sat down for the first time with the organization’s chief risk officer. As the IT head of one of the Fed’s 12 regional banks, he was there to provide input on risk, as part of an initiative to create an enterprise risk management framework.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Risk Management, Cloud Security

Info-Security Champs: Your Guide to the Cloud

For the first time in its 10-year history, the CyberCrime Symposium featured breakout sessions, a nod to past-audience requests for content tailored to different functional roles. The sessions, offered on both days of the event, comprised two separate tracks — one technical, the other on risk and compliance.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Cloud Security

Five Cloud Security Lessons

During the closing session of the 2019 CyberCrime Symposium, we heard from Tyler Cybersecurity clients and our partners at Amazon Web Services (AWS) about their experience using cloud services. Each person brought a different, but insightful perspective to the table and shared what’s been working for them (or not) in the cloud. Let’s recount the top lessons we learned from the session.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Cloud Security

Securing the Cloud Takes a Community

At his 2019 CyberCrime Symposium presentation, Jim Reavis saluted the audience for participating in the annual event, noting the high ratio of return attendees.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Cloud Security

Automation, Algorithms and AI — Oh My

Futurist, author, and consultant Mike Walsh spends 300-some-odd days a year traveling the globe researching technology trends, keynoting industry events, and guiding organizational leaders through the complexities of digital disruption. Appropriately, then, his 2018 CyberCrime Symposium presentation took attendees on a whirlwind tour of the transformative forces they’ll manage if they want to thrive in an increasingly AI-driven world. As he told the info-sec and privacy officers in attendance, the goalposts that marked 2020 as AI’s future zone have been pushed back a decade or so, but he warned them not to get complacent.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, IoT, Privacy

Face It: Cameras are Everywhere

Christopher Pierson thinks facial recognition, as both a topic and a biometric, is “super cool,” and that enthusiasm energized his 2018 CyberCrime Symposium session, “The Privacy and Security Implications of Facial Recognition.” But because he’s worn so many professional hats — from inventor, CISO, CPO, and general counsel, to member of DHS’s Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee and its Cybersecurity Subcommittee — he could exult in facial scanning technology’s cool factor while laying out some of the growing legal, ethical, and privacy concerns surrounding it. 

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Privacy

Blockchain Can Build Decentralized Trust

A pioneering force in VoIP, streaming media, and collaborative tools, Dan Harple has had a front-row seat to the evolution of the Internet. In his 2018 CyberCrime Symposium session, Harple, now CEO of Context Labs, compellingly argued that the Internet’s commercialization has created the very centralization that DARPA and its TCP/IP inventors wanted to prevent when they designed a decentralized Internet architecture. By concentrating critical assets and data in one place, centralized systems increase cybersecurity risks, because once cyber threat actors penetrate defenses, they’ve got the keys to the kingdom.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Blockchain

Does Malware Have Citizenship?

In talks with information security professionals at security conferences, user group events, and customer sites, Chester Wisniewski frequently fields questions about country-based blocking as a network defense tactic. Though he couldn’t find any published data to confirm his assumptions, “I couldn’t see any meaningful correlation between the countries from which traffic originates and attack patterns,” said Wisniewski, a principal research scientist at Sophos.

Read More

Topics: CyberCrime Symposium, Threat Intelligence, Threat Hunting